Endgame: The MCU’s Immature, Messy, but Satisfying “Conclusion”

Avengers Endgame Review

Avatar: the Last Airbender and Legend of Korra show creator Bryan Konietzko once said that the best stories have endings. What he meant was that, no matter how much we love certain characters, eventually we have to realize that their narrative journey is over and move on. In Avengers: Endgame, the MCU likely came as close as it ever will to providing this type of closure.

Continue reading Endgame: The MCU’s Immature, Messy, but Satisfying “Conclusion”

Joss Whedon: Age of Ultron's Directing Marvel

When February 22nd rolls around next year, I can guarantee that Avengers: Age of Ultron will not be nominated for Best Picture. Nor should it be for, in my opinion, the movie always has too much going on to ever come together in a complete and fully rewarding way. That said, I can also guarantee that Joss Whedon will miss a nomination as Best Director, and this will be a far greater oversight. That is because while Avengers: Age of Ultron may not be an incredibly “good” movie, it is still a really fun and well-made one. Considering the weight of characters, plot threads, action sequences, and emotional threads that all had to be balanced: this is an achievement, one that is not likely to be repeated this year (and perhaps ever).

Alas, Whedon will have to contend with simply being adored by fans as a great director and a leader in the feminist human rights movement... what a shame.
Alas, Whedon will have to contend with simply being adored by fans as a great director and a leader in the feminist human rights movement… how will he sleep at night?

To give a rundown: Age of Ultron is the continuing adventures of Captain America, Iron Man, the Incredible Hulk, Thor, Black Widow, Hawkeye, and Nick Fury – meaning all these characters are in the movie. Oh, and let’s not forget the three new Avengers: Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch, and the Vision (of these characters begin the movie as villains). Okay, got them too. Oh and let’s not forget the cameos and supporting characters: War Machine, Falcon, Maria Hill, Stan Lee (cause apparently he needs at least one scene), Peggy Carter, Heimdall, Erik Selvig, Baron Strucker, Ulysses Klaue, and many others… seriously – there are others. I’m just done listing them. Oh, and OH YEAH – Ultron… and Thanos too…

There was even evidence to support a cameo from your friendly neighborhood wallcrawler... but sadly, this video has been exposed as a skilled fake.
There was even evidence to support a cameo from your friendly neighborhood wall-crawler… but sadly, this video has been exposed as a skilled fake.

I just named enough random names in a row to sound like part of the book of Genesis.

For those wondering, the film has a running time of 141 minutes, or two hours and twenty-one minutes, which is not that long. To give a comparison, if I may; The Hobbit: the Desolation of Smaug ran 161 minutes… and that did not even contain the whole story of a children’s book. Damn.

And it works, that is the single most impressive thing I can say about Avengers: Age of Ultron. It does not always work well – indeed there are several sequences where the mass of the movie appears poised to explode out and bury the plot – but this never happens. In part because Whedon stuck again to basics (like he did in the first movie).

A major flaw in film stories today is that they fail to cram too much complexity into their two and a half hour run time. Whedon wisely sticks to doing this model well.
A story has a simple bone structure and Whedon is skilled at sticking to – and knowing when to pad – this frame.

Ultron is a simple villain, but still well done. His plan is not complicated, his emotions are not buried under layers of psychosis. He is a refreshingly human robot with a simple dream… a dream of killing all humans. The voice work of the wickedly talented James Spader helps bring the character to life, as well as a beautifully tragic birth sequence.

A simple main conflict allows Whedon time to work with his characters – and work he does. Rising tension between Captain America (Chris Evans) and Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.), fluttering eyelashes between Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo) and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), Thor (Chris Hemsworth) questioning his purpose and his actions, and arguably the best scenes of all saved for Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) – and a path from villain to hero for Quicksilver (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) and Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen). Samuel L. Jackson‘s Nick Fury is the only returning star who feels a little left out in the cold.

Hawkeye may be lacking in cool powers, but Whedon knows the character well enough to bring out exactly why he is a member of the team.
Hawkeye may be lacking in cool powers, but Whedon knows the character well enough to bring out exactly why he is a member of the team.

Of course… this is a summer movie – and that means action. Those looking for it will get their fill. A castle raid, an oil tanker brawl, Hulk vs. Hulk Buster, Avengers vs. Ultron: the movie brings it all in spades. By the end, one might even be a little sick of slow motion sequences of our heroes beating up on robots… but one can also get sick from eating too much ice cream.

In terms of spectacle, it does not disappoint.
In terms of spectacle, it does not disappoint.

Joss Whedon has done the near impossible, wrestling this much comic book into one movie. Time will tell exactly how much of his background as a comic book writer and official super geek helped him achieve this – or whether others who don’t share this background can do the same (Marvel is certainly hoping they can). Whedon’s familiarity with the characters and source material has clearly helped him to do more with less in his past two mega superhero mash-ups.

It is simply too bad that he will not be returning for the sequels. Time will see if the Avengers can triumph without their real leader.

Dear Bill Watterson: Thank You… but You're Out of Touch with Comics

Recently, I sat down and watched Dr. Mr. Watterson, a documentary made on the subject of Bill Watterson and, more specifically, his creation, Calvin and Hobbes. Now, I normally am not a huge fan of documentaries: I find that they tend to present only a very skewed perspective (save for the better ones). Dr. Mr. Watterson was a light, nostalgic, gush over one of the greatest newspaper comics of all time. It was entertaining but without much depth. A quick history lesson for anyone unfamiliar with the story between the panels.

A lot of love clearly went into Dr. Mr. Watterson, unfortunately it obscures the storytelling aspects at times and prevents the documentary from offering up anything truly insightful.
A lot of love clearly went into Dr. Mr. Watterson, unfortunately it obscures the storytelling aspects at times and prevents the documentary from offering up anything truly insightful.

The most interesting part of the documentary was a brief interview with cartoonist Stephen Pastis (creator of Pearls Before Swine). What makes this interesting? Just months after the release of Dr. Mr. Watterson, Bill Watterson would make a brief resurgence into the world of cartoons, illustrating several strips of Pearls Before Swine, as well as voicing the character Libby. That’s right: Bill Watterson came out of retirement… for a week. No new Calvin and Hobbes but hey – it’s still pretty awesome. Between June 2nd and June 7th, Watterson highlighted the world of Pearls Before Swine. So, what did he have to say:

Evidently, Watterson still doesn't think much of the future of comics.
Evidently, Watterson still doesn’t think much of the future of comics.

There is a sad truth that I will make clear right now: Bill Watterson is not perfect. I love Calvin and Hobbes, I find it to be one of the most appealing and insightful creations ever made. To create something that amazing is an incredible feat and Bill Watterson has nothing left to prove to anyone. He is an artistic genius and the world is a brighter place with him in it. That said…

Bill Watterson is out of touch. For those out there unfamiliar with the reasons why Calvin and Hobbes ended: there are two. One, Watterson felt that the comic was starting to repeat itself and wanted to end it on a high note. Two, Watterson felt that newspaper comics were a dying art form as the space was becoming too restricted to allow great art to be drawn. He also felt that the lack of space greatly limited the storytelling potential.

Watterson also did not think much of merchandising, which explains why you've never seen any official Calvin and Hobbes merchandise anywhere.
Watterson also did not think much of merchandising, which explains why you’ve never seen any official Calvin and Hobbes merchandise anywhere.

Now as to that first reason: it is the best reason ever to end something. Anyone can create art for the sake of a paycheck (how many years has Garfield been running… is anyone out there still laughing?). To end Calvin and Hobbes at the height of its popularity remains a bold move and has insured that its legacy was never tarnished with sub-par material. It is a shame that more creations don’t follow Calvin and Hobbes‘ lead in that area (looking at you, Simpsons).

This may also be one of the best endings out there. It is perfect and poetic.
This may also be one of the best endings out there. It is perfect and poetic.

Regarding reason number two: also extremely valid. Anyone who has looked at the newspaper comics recently knows that they do not receive a lot of room. Not that there are not a couple of really talented artists still illustrating for newspapers… but it’s a newspaper. That medium as a whole is in its twilight era. Watterson was correct to label newspaper comics as a dying platform, but the world has changed since 1995.

Behold… the INTERNET! One of the main areas not addressed in Dear. Mr. Watterson was the evolution of the comic medium. Everyone interviewed simply talked about how the glory days had passed and that we’ll never have something like Calvin and Hobbes again. While that may be true (there will only EVER be one Calvin and Hobbes), comics are far from dead. Simply ask this question: how did you read Pearls Before Swine when Watterson reappeared? Did you open your door and uncurl the newspaper to find the comics section? I know I didn’t. I went online and viewed the panels on a website. That is where the comics have gone.

Regardless of how you feel about it, there is no denying that the art in Penny Arcade has benefited greatly from a lack of physical space restriction.
Regardless of how you feel about it, there is no denying that the art of Penny Arcade has benefited greatly from a lack of physical space restriction.

The art form is not dying, it has found a new home. Watterson’s declarations in Pearls Before Swine highlight how out of touch with technology he is. Granted, this is not too surprising from the man who created a character such as Calvin’s father:

Calvin's father may very well echo Watterson's own distrust of technology, specifically interaction with media.
Calvin’s father may very well echo Watterson’s own distrust of technology, specifically interaction with media.

Now, for the record: I do not think that Bill Watterson has any obligation to return to the world of comics. He has done enough. Yet his second reason for ending Calvin and Hobbes is simply no longer valid. Yes, newspaper comics have severe space limitations but who cares? We have the internet! That is where all the truly great new comics appear. There are no limitations on a webpage… and no deadlines either. It is one of the primary wonders of digital technology: worrying about space is a thing of the past.

Sigh, you do Mr. Watterson. You literally have unlimited space if you know how to take advantage of it.
Sigh, you do Mr. Watterson. You literally have unlimited space if you know how to take advantage of it.

Bill Watterson’s time as a contributing artist may be done… who knows what the future will bring. Personally, I hope that he finds the time to learn about the internet and create something truly wonderful. Calvin and Hobbes is over (don’t hold out hope for that animated movie), but Bill Watterson is still alive and still a terrific artist. He just is a little out of touch… he needs to learn to do the things with the computers.