Thinking Progress: Ohio Straight Pride

Okay, time to talk on a controversial issue… something new and different. For those of you unaware, recently students at an Ohio University put up signs/posters advocating for “Straight Pride.” I’ll let the now infamous poster speak for itself:

o-STRAIGHT-PRIDE-570In case you can’t read the fine print at the bottom, it says: “Brought to you by the students that are sick of hearing about your LGBT pride. Nobody cares about what you think you are, or what you want to have sex with. We have nothing against your sexual orientation. We just don’t give a fuck.”

Apparently there were other posters… but this seems to be the only one I could find. Naturally, a poster like this upset a good many people. The LGBT community at the University denounced the poster as “homophobic” and they were promptly taken down.

Okay, for the record, I do think these posters are incredibly insensitive. They undermine the importance of Gay Pride and the LGBT community by indicating that homophobia, a prejudice very much still alive and well, is over and done with. Pretending that a prejudice is over, despite blinding evidence to the contrary, is sadly nothing new.

I tried to find a larger version of this because it is just so perfect.
I tried to find a larger version of this because it is just so perfect.

Is that poster homophobic: yeah, through the omission of any admittance that homophobia is actually an issue that a lot of the LGBT community still struggle with. I am not saying these posters are right, or validated, or anything like that.

THAT SAID…

This might actually be the start of a good thing.

I know, I can’t say something like that without making a solid attempt to back it up. Progress happens slowly… but it does happen. Anyone who says that there has not been progress on an issue like racism is as much an extreme fool as anyone who says racism is over. For example: we right now are enduring an awareness of a tragic and unacceptable level of racism on United States police forces. Their actions are criminal and for many black families, this ugly reality is too real. That said, this is still a definite improvement over 200 years ago when virtually ALL blacks in America were property, not people. We (Americans) do have a black president. There is an increasing number of successful black individuals in the world. It is getting better: slowly, painfully, but progress is happening.

The progress on gay rights has been far more extraordinary, given the time scale. Sixty years ago: being gay was a disease in most of the “civilized” world. Now, gay marriage and equality are rapidly occurring. The difference in generational thinking on the issue of gay rights is staggering, with a reported 71% of “millennials” being in favor.

3-20-13-1I wrote some time ago on the coming out of actress Ellen Page and athlete Michael Sam, and said how irrelevant their sexuality should be to their identity, and I still believe this. So I am admitting common ground with these “Straight priders.” I do feel that, in a perfect world, that Gay Pride should no longer have to exist because a person’s sexuality is not innately linked to the content of their character. I am straight, and I blessedly do not need straight pride, because being straight in the world matters no more than having blue eyes.

If all you see when you look at actor Ian McKellan is a gay man, then you are really missing the point of just what an awesome human being he is.
If all you see when you look at actor Ian McKellen is a gay man, then you are really missing the point of just what an awesome human being he is.

Even Ian McKellen is saying “get over it.” How different is that message from the poster above? Well, authorship matters. I mean, who better to say that homophobia is over than a gay individual? Well.. as of this moment, I do not know who authored the “Straight Pride” posters. I have made an effort to locate this information but have been unsuccessful. If any out there know for sure and can give me a link: it would be appreciated. I do know who is being blamed:

 

"When individuals belong to dominant societal cohorts (Caucasian, male, heterosexual, etc.) it is very easy to state "We have nothing against your sexual orientation" and to claim that efforts to raise awareness are "annoying." For minorities who every day face discrimination and marginalization, such efforts are necessary -- without zeal and persistence, sociology teaches that minority concerns very easily go by the wayside. Thus, dismissing the efforts of LGBTQIA students to push for equitable treatment as unnecessary is dangerous because it catalyzes discrimination, whether meant to do so or not." - YSU Student Government
“When individuals belong to dominant societal cohorts (Caucasian, male, heterosexual, etc.) it is very easy to state “We have nothing against your sexual orientation” and to claim that efforts to raise awareness are “annoying.” For minorities who every day face discrimination and marginalization, such efforts are necessary — without zeal and persistence, sociology teaches that minority concerns very easily go by the wayside. Thus, dismissing the efforts of LGBTQIA students to push for equitable treatment as unnecessary is dangerous because it catalyzes discrimination, whether meant to do so or not.” – YSU Student Government

Hate to tell the politically correct and super sensitive body that is YSU, but that’s profiling. Are they right: probably. But this general accusation is no different from someone saying “oh you got robbed, probably a black guy” or “listen to that lisp, he’s probably gay.” If we’re going to be equal, equality goes both ways. General rule of life: if you don’t know something, don’t jump to conclusions.

Another point of contention: I have real problems with them removing the posters. The United States is at least supposed to be a land of freedom of expression, and this arguably is our most important feature. Whether something is “offensive” or not does not matter. For those wondering, here are the limitations of freedom of speech. It is important to note that material that would directly incite harm to others is not protected. That said, those posters are not openly hateful. They do not encourage violence towards the LGBT community, at least not so far as I can deduce from that one (again, I have tried unsuccessfully to find other posters). Are they offensive? Absolutely, but what does that even mean?

0e0Idiots are part of progress, this is the truth. People denouncing racism or homophobia or anything else as “over” can be seen as simply people trying (sometimes damagingly) to over simplify life. The fact that a bunch of college kids got overly wound up in their political views and published controversial material is nothing new, and should not be given the attention of the media world. It draws focus to them and gives them more power than they should have.

So was “Straight Pride” a good thing by itself, nope. Seen as a larger part of a progressive acceptance of gay culture however, it is not terrible. The extremes are the first ones who will say Gay Pride is not needed anymore… but the fact that people are starting to say it is, in itself, a sign of progress.

The Road to Hell is Paved with Good Intentions: An Apology to Brendan Eich (Former CEO of Mozilla)

I will begin this with important context: in the past, I have made it very clear that I support gay marriage and human rights for everyone. There is no group that I would deny basic freedoms to… including those I disagree with. That said, I must make clear that I did not join in the celebration that took place yesterday. The Mozilla Corporation announced that new CEO Brendan Eich was stepping down from his position. The decision was not Mr. Eich’s idea but rather came after enormous public outcry against his promotion to CEO. People were angry that, in 2008, Brendan Eich donated $1,000 to support Proposition 8 (an anti-gay marriage bill in California). Eich’s promotion to CEO prompted several other high-ups at Mozilla to leave the company, and spurred OkCupid to institute a disclaimer on their site for Firefox users. The reaction to this awareness campaign was swift and Eich was forced out. Wew, score one for LGBT… right? I don’t think so.

OKCupid's message to people operating on the Firefox browser. The message did not prohibit Firefox users from using the site but informed them of Mr. Eich's past actions.
OkCupid’s message to people operating on the Firefox browser. The message did not prohibit Firefox users from using the site but informed them of Mr. Eich’s past actions.

The United States of America promotes two things above all else: a belief in democracy and a belief in capitalism. How people personally feel about those two subjects is irrelevant, they have long been a part of the U.S. heritage. These two issues do not always agree. History is full of instances where the two clash and conflict continues today (look at the 1% vs. the Occupy Movement). In 1976, the Supreme Court determined that spending money was the equivalent to freedom of speech. Based on the information out there, I believe the Mr. Eich’s right to free speech was violated.

When I first saw the issue through my Facebook newsfeed, one question in particular peaked my curiousity. Had Eich spent his own money or had he made an investment on behalf of Mozilla? These two things are very different. If the donation had been made in Mozilla’s name, then the entire company would be held responsible. Corporations recently have won some of the rights of people (so, so bad for democracy) but, if they want the rights, they can deal with the responsibilities. That said, it seems silly to me to punish an entire corporation based off the actions of one individual. Sure, boycott Mozilla because they have a homophobic CEO, boycott X-Men: Days of Future Past because it contains at least one gay actor, boycott Walmart… actually that’s not a bad idea. Point is: corporations are huge and not responsible for what employees do in their free time. Eich did not do anything illegal, he committed (I believe I am using the technical term here) a dick move. Is he an asshole for spending money to stop people from getting married: yes. Should he be fired for that… well, if yes then so should a lot of other people.

Based on the information I have found, I believe the donation was made in Eich’s name, and with his own money. Money that, according to the United States Constitution, he is allowed to spend any way that he wants, so long as it is not illegally. To condone or condemn an individual, based solely on his/her purchase history, does not sound like democracy to me.

“Okay, sure but he was homophobic! Surely this man should not be allowed to lead a company!”

Do you know him? I don’t, but let’s look at the facts. It is public record that 2008, Eich donated to a homophobic campaign. Six years ago he did that. No question. Done deal. Here is a statement from Mr. Eich made last week. If Brendan Eich’s public statement is to be believed, then he was a reformed man who acknowledged his mistakes and was trying to work forward. Granted, he might be lying and it might have been a PR stunt… but it might not have been. Forgiveness is a large part of modern society. There is a commonly held believe that everyone deserves at least a second chance. The world has changed radically in recent times, especially concerning the public view of LGBT rights.

“But wait, there were issues at Mozilla. People there were angry and left the company. He wasn’t reformed!”

Again, the public does not know for certain why those people resigned over Eich’s promotion. It is not uncommon for several other higher-ups to resign after one is promoted to CEO. The perception is that, if that person was just promoted, he isn’t going anywhere in the near future. Their leaving could simply be a career move. Mozilla themselves came out against the claim that there was any personal rift at all that caused the leavings. Granted, Mozilla could also have been denying it in an attempt to avoid the scandal that they just suffered.

Let’s flash back to 1998. Bill Clinton was on trial, a trial that could have cost him the Presidency of the United States. He was accused of lying under oath. On the surface that sounds like a very serious crime. However, the issue that former President Clinton lied about was, frankly, none of the country’s business and was in no way connected to his abilities as a world leader. Clinton was charged with lying about adultery (the Monica Lewinsky scandal). Does that say something about Bill Clinton as a husband, yes. Did it have anything to do with him as a president, no. I feel that this case is similar.

I am not defending the past homophobic actions of Brendan Eich. His old views on the LGBT community are backward, and if he hasn’t truly reformed then he is still a bigot. It is simply a very dangerous sign when moral judgment dictates society and policy. No one is clean, everyone has done something wrong. If Eich is still homophobic, I highly doubt that this has done anything to enlighten his views. That is the real tragedy. To use parody, I believe the South Park character, Big Gay Al, put it best:

“Look, I appreciate what you kids did. I really do. But this isn’t what I wanted. I’m proud to be gay. And I’m proud to be in a country where I’m free to express myself. But freedom is a two-way street. If I’m free to express myself, then the scouts have to be free to express themselves too. I know these [scout leaders]. They are good men. They are kind men. They do what they think is best for the kids. No matter how wrong we think they might be, it isn’t right for us to force them to think our way. It’s up to us to persuade and help them see the light, not extort them to? I will continue to persuade them to change their minds, but this is the wrong way to do it. So, I am hereby dropping my case and allowing the scouts their right to not allow gays into their private club.”
“Look, I appreciate what you kids did. I really do. But this isn’t what I wanted. I’m proud to be gay. And I’m proud to be in a country where I’m free to express myself. But freedom is a two-way street. If I’m free to express myself, then the scouts have to be free to express themselves too. I know these [scout leaders]. They are good men. They are kind men. They do what they think is best for the kids. No matter how wrong we think they might be, it isn’t right for us to force them to think our way. It’s up to us to persuade and help them see the light, not extort them to? I will continue to persuade them to change their minds, but this is the wrong way to do it.”
Forcing other people to think a certain way is never the right answer. Punishing an opinion, even a wrong one, is useless without teaching the correct one. That is what happened… that is the best case scenario for what happened (otherwise a man trying for redemption was crucified for past mistakes). Oh, and anyone celebrating that justice was really done: he stepped down as CEO, he was not fired. I have read nothing that makes me think that Brendan Eich no longer has a job with Mozilla. I may be wrong, that is simply my thinking after reading.

I was homophobic once too. I grew up with ignorant views. My eyes were opened and I have learned how wrong I was, thankfully before I was ever in the position to deny anyone their rights. This can be done the right way, the world is already changing. Fast communication is a double-edged sword: it can cause quick action, like in the case of Eich. However, if people are not properly educated and make informed decisions, there will always be room for prejudice and bigotry. Let us simply not replace one kind with another.

For now, with the information available, I feel that Brendan Eich is owed an apology.